Things to do in Paris

Paris, the City of Lights, is synonymous with the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, the Musée d’Orsay, the Arc de Triomphe, Versailles, Montmartre, the Pantheon and Notre Dame. It is the city of love but also the city of food, nightlife, and fashion. Wide boulevards and the Seine cross the 19th-century urban landscape. Paris, divided into 20 arrondissements (districts) and is constituted of 60% of the famous Haussmanian buildings. This is the result of the renovation of Paris, which was commissioned by Emperor Napoléon III and directed by his prefect of the Seine, Georges-Eugène Haussmann, between 1853 and 1870, during the second French empire. The town is also famous for its cafés and luxury boutiques along Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré. There’s a whole other city waiting to be explored. Sometimes, you discover that a nighttime or early-morning visit of an attraction or a monument is quieter and more atmospheric. In the laid-back districts of Belleville and Ménilmontant, you can tour the distinctive street art. Expert guides can reveal more than your touristic guidebook could ever tell you.

Louvre Museum

Located along the banks of the Seine River in Paris, the Louvre Museum is the world’s most visited museum. Its legendary collection boasts more than 35,000 paintings, sculptures, and artifacts dating back from prehistory to the modern day, and it is deemed to be the greatest in the world. This collection features notorious world-wide works, such as the Mona Lisa, the Winged Victory of Samothrace, and the Venus de Milo. Formerly a royal palace, the Louvre has embraced the history of France for eight centuries. The contemporary Pyramid heralds the museum's entrance, which millions of tourists flock to every year. The Louvre museum is one of Paris' most significant tourist attractions.

Eiffel Tower

It goes without saying that the Eiffel Tower is the symbol of the city. It is the first stop for visitors coming to Paris. It is the most important attraction in the lists of places to see in Paris. The Eiffel Tower was built between 1887 and 1889. The construction was based on the project of Gustave Eiffel as the gateway to the 1889 Paris world's fair. 3,000 workers assembled 18,038 pieces of iron, using more than 2.5 million rivets, in 26 months. The fact that there was not a serious work accident is a surprising when considering the working conditions of that time. Since its opening, the Eiffel Tower has been visited by more than 200 million people.

Musée d’Orsay

For the first time, a building that was built for industrial goals has been converted into a museum dedicated to the art of the 19th Century especially Impressionism and post-impressionism. TheOrsay Museum welcomes its visitors with the scent of the sea and a refreshing breeze. The Orsay Museum make people think “Very first art piece of Orsay Museum is Orsay Museum’s itself!” Enjoy one of the finest museums within walking distance to the Louvre museum.

Disneyland

Disneyland Paris was the fourth Disney park to be built and the first in Europe. Well connected to Paris via RER, the "happiest place on earth" features two theme parks: Disneyland Park and Walt Disney Studios. The Parks are full of rides for any age range, from carousels to rollercoaster. It is the perfect way to spend a day with your family or friends in this childhood atmosphere.

Versailles Palace

The Palace of Versailles is one of the biggest and the most beautiful royal palaces with the capacity of 20,000 people; Louis XIV commissioned it in 1668. These buildings’ projects were designed by Louis La Vau ve Jules Hardouin-Mansart. The gardens of the palace are breathtaking and the fountains' show is amazing. There are separate tickets for the Versailles Palace, Versailles Gardens, and the fountains show, but all-inclusive pass can be used to visit the entire complex.

Arc de Triomphe

The Arc de Triomphe is one of the most towering monuments in the world and it stands solidly right in the middle of Charles de Gaulle Square. It was initially conceived to celebrate Napoleonian victories, but it was eventually dedicated to those who perished fighting for France between 1792 and 1815. There is the grave of one unidentified soldier died in the war, beneath the monument. This magnificent monument with 50 meters height, 45 meters width and 22 meters depth is the second biggest monument in the world. Titus arch in Rome influenced the design.

Notre Dame Cathedral

The Cathedral of Notre-Dame was built in 1345 and witnessed many centuries of history. It is one of the main touristic attractions, drawing 13 million visitors per year. The number of visitors is even higher than that of other Paris' famous attractions such as the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre Museum. The gothic architecture is impressive. Watching over La Ville Lumiere, gargoyles and chimeras can be spotted on the external walls of the cathedral, on the buttresses and bell towers. The statues were originally painted in colors that faded over time. It is possible to climb to the top of the cathedral and enjoy a breathtaking view of the city.

Seine River

The Seine is a beautiful stop for both travelers and locals. Be seduced by the beauty of the river and bridges such as Pont des Arts and the Bridge of Lovers. On the last bridge, it is a long-established tradition that lovers lock a padlock on the fence of the bridge and throw the keys off as good omen for eternal love. A cruise on the Seine is a good option to see the city from a different point of view, specially during the sunset.

Moulin Rouge

Paris had become extremely popular when the Moulin Rouge was first opened. According to the declaration of the owners, Joseph Oller and Charles Zidler, this place holds the title of being the first “Woman Palace.” Although it has caused many rumors over time, it still is one of the most visited touristic places in Paris.

Catacombs of Paris

The Catacombs of Paris are an underground ossuary, whose origin, despite its name, dates back only to the end of the eighteenth century, when in 1786, to cope with the spread of epidemics caused by the saturation of some cemeteries, the Council of State decided to move the bones preserved in the mass graves in these underground quarries. The Catacombs, which store the remains of about six million people represented only a deposit of bones but nowadays have become a very suggestive place.